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The Daily Dish: 26 Restaurants Receive Stars in China’s First Michelin Guide

The Daily Dish: 26 Restaurants Receive Stars in China’s First Michelin Guide



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26 Restaurants Receive Stars in China’s First Michelin Guide

China’s first Michelin Guide, covering the city of Shanghai, was released Wednesday. Twenty-six restaurants were awarded Michelin stars, but only one received the top honor of three Michelin stars: T’ang Court in The Langham Hotel. The Cantonese restaurant has only six tables. Six restaurants were awarded two Michelin stars, including Ultraviolet, a multi-sensory restaurant that projects images on the walls and pumps out fragrances “to enhance the dining experience.” (Ironically, a restaurant that received one star in the ratings, Taian Table, was closed down by the authorities the day after the guide was published for operating without the proper permits.) The Michelin Guide currently awards stars to restaurants in 28 different countries.

McDonald’s Debuts Pumpkin Spice Fries in Japan

McDonald’s Japan is doling out French fries drizzled with pumpkin spice and chocolate sauce just in time for Halloween, which has become an increasingly popular holiday in Japan in recent years. You can get your own basket of pumpkin spice fries, officially known as "Halloween Choco Potato" fries, starting Sept. 28 in Japan. Unfortunately, there are no plans to sell them in the United States yet, but if ghosts and goblins gobble them up in Japan this year, perhaps they’ll make their way to American McDonald’s outlets next year.

Would You Drink Tea From an Aerosol Can?

For tea-lovers looking to enjoy a hot cup of tea without soggy tea bags, No More Tea Bags provides a solution. Customers simply dispense a pre-brewed tea concentrate from an aerosol can into a cup and add hot water and milk, if desired. “We brew proper leaf tea for the perfect amount of time so you don’t have to, and it’s never underbrewed,” the company website reads. Each can yields approximately 20 cups of average-strength tea, The Globe and Mail detailed. “It was really about just trying to make a better cup of tea,” said Guy Woodall, maker of No More Tea Bags. The concentrate is available in three flavors: English breakfast, Earl Grey, and jasmine.

Someone Actually Invented a Hamburger-Hot Dog Hybrid Called the Hamdog

A hamburger-hot dog hybrid has combined two of America’s most popular foods in one convenient handheld product. The Hamdog’s unusually shaped bun allows room for both a hamburger and hot dog to fit, so you can eat them at the same time without making a mess or juggling two sandwiches. “I had the idea on holiday when I was leaving a bar in Nashville. I grabbed a burger and a hot dog as I was really hungry,” its creator, Mark Murray of Perth, Australia, told CNBC about his eureka moment in 2004. “I was sitting in the car eating them both at the same time and my wife was looking at me like I was an idiot.” Mark was awarded at U.S. patent for his creation in 2009 and hopes to bring the Hamdog to America next year.

Would You Try the Spiciest Ice Cream in the World?

One boardwalk restaurant in Rehoboth, Delaware, has you sign a waiver before diving into one of its ice cream sundaes. Why? The ice cream for its Scorpion Sting sundae is made with ghost pepper (also known as the world’s hottest pepper), and it’s so hot that it earned a spot in the newest Ripley’s publication, Ripley’s Believe It or Not! Unlock the Weird!, just released this month. Oh yeah, and each cone is topped with a real (but deceased) scorpion. Consume at your own risk. “Because of the sugar content and the milk it sort of mitigates it a little bit,” owner Chip Hearn told ABC News. “So some people go [screams] and they can't handle it. Other people go, ‘that wasn't so bad.’”


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Michelin is creating a restaurant guide for California, the first regional guide in the U.S. from the world’s foremost arbiter of gastronomic excellence.

The California guide will include restaurants from the San Francisco Bay Area, wine country, Los Angeles, Monterey, Orange County, Sacramento, San Diego, and Santa Barbara, the company announced on March 5. Michelin will reveal which restaurants receive its coveted star rankings at a June event in Huntington Beach.

The guide is an indication of the growing global recognition of the dining scene throughout the state of California. Michelin published its first guide in 1900, and has long published guides dedicated to countries in Europe. It began a guide to San Francisco, which included the restaurants of the Napa Valley, in 2007. Chicago, New York, and Washington, D.C., are the only other U.S. cities that have their own standalone guides. (One for Los Angeles was discontinued in 2009.)

“We recognize California as the land of food and wine,’’ Gwendal Poullennec, the international director of the Michelin guides, said. “Michelin inspectors have been dining anonymously across California over the past year, and they’ve been very impressed by the creativity displayed by your chefs and the quality of fresh ingredients across the state.’” Poullennec spoke alongside chef Thomas Keller, the founding chef of The French Laundry, the first restaurant in California to receive three stars, Michelin’s highest honor.

Michelin’s reach has been expanding across the world in the past few years. It now publishes guides dedicated to Shanghai, Bangkok, São Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro.

At first glance, the choice of California may seem an odd one. The restaurant guide typically rewards restaurants whose kitchens exhibit refined technique and whose owners offer attentive service and a comprehensive wine list. A three-star restaurant traditionally brings to mind a fancy French restaurant with pressed white tablecloths. By comparison, California is the farm stand for the rest of the U.S., and its most famous chefs have preached a simple approach to cooking, a stark contrast to France’s halls of haute cuisine. Los Angeles, California’s largest city, was never taken as seriously by restaurant writers as New York or San Francisco because its food scene isn’t defined by fine dining. The eateries most evocative of Los Angeles are the taco truck and the roadside burger stand, the strip mall sushi joint and Korean barbecue.

Yet the culinary world has changed, and Michelin is trying to change along with it. Critics and judges who grew to appreciate the simple excellence of Alice Waters, the chef at Chez Panisse, have also bestowed stars on restaurants that specialize in inexpensive delicacies like Singaporean chicken rice, Hong Kong dim sum, and Chinese roast goose.

Michelin acknowledged this dissonance, pledging to maintain its standards while also praising California’s “signature high-quality yet laid-back dining ambience,” according to Poullennec.


SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Michelin is creating a restaurant guide for California, the first regional guide in the U.S. from the world’s foremost arbiter of gastronomic excellence.

The California guide will include restaurants from the San Francisco Bay Area, wine country, Los Angeles, Monterey, Orange County, Sacramento, San Diego, and Santa Barbara, the company announced on March 5. Michelin will reveal which restaurants receive its coveted star rankings at a June event in Huntington Beach.

The guide is an indication of the growing global recognition of the dining scene throughout the state of California. Michelin published its first guide in 1900, and has long published guides dedicated to countries in Europe. It began a guide to San Francisco, which included the restaurants of the Napa Valley, in 2007. Chicago, New York, and Washington, D.C., are the only other U.S. cities that have their own standalone guides. (One for Los Angeles was discontinued in 2009.)

“We recognize California as the land of food and wine,’’ Gwendal Poullennec, the international director of the Michelin guides, said. “Michelin inspectors have been dining anonymously across California over the past year, and they’ve been very impressed by the creativity displayed by your chefs and the quality of fresh ingredients across the state.’” Poullennec spoke alongside chef Thomas Keller, the founding chef of The French Laundry, the first restaurant in California to receive three stars, Michelin’s highest honor.

Michelin’s reach has been expanding across the world in the past few years. It now publishes guides dedicated to Shanghai, Bangkok, São Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro.

At first glance, the choice of California may seem an odd one. The restaurant guide typically rewards restaurants whose kitchens exhibit refined technique and whose owners offer attentive service and a comprehensive wine list. A three-star restaurant traditionally brings to mind a fancy French restaurant with pressed white tablecloths. By comparison, California is the farm stand for the rest of the U.S., and its most famous chefs have preached a simple approach to cooking, a stark contrast to France’s halls of haute cuisine. Los Angeles, California’s largest city, was never taken as seriously by restaurant writers as New York or San Francisco because its food scene isn’t defined by fine dining. The eateries most evocative of Los Angeles are the taco truck and the roadside burger stand, the strip mall sushi joint and Korean barbecue.

Yet the culinary world has changed, and Michelin is trying to change along with it. Critics and judges who grew to appreciate the simple excellence of Alice Waters, the chef at Chez Panisse, have also bestowed stars on restaurants that specialize in inexpensive delicacies like Singaporean chicken rice, Hong Kong dim sum, and Chinese roast goose.

Michelin acknowledged this dissonance, pledging to maintain its standards while also praising California’s “signature high-quality yet laid-back dining ambience,” according to Poullennec.


SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Michelin is creating a restaurant guide for California, the first regional guide in the U.S. from the world’s foremost arbiter of gastronomic excellence.

The California guide will include restaurants from the San Francisco Bay Area, wine country, Los Angeles, Monterey, Orange County, Sacramento, San Diego, and Santa Barbara, the company announced on March 5. Michelin will reveal which restaurants receive its coveted star rankings at a June event in Huntington Beach.

The guide is an indication of the growing global recognition of the dining scene throughout the state of California. Michelin published its first guide in 1900, and has long published guides dedicated to countries in Europe. It began a guide to San Francisco, which included the restaurants of the Napa Valley, in 2007. Chicago, New York, and Washington, D.C., are the only other U.S. cities that have their own standalone guides. (One for Los Angeles was discontinued in 2009.)

“We recognize California as the land of food and wine,’’ Gwendal Poullennec, the international director of the Michelin guides, said. “Michelin inspectors have been dining anonymously across California over the past year, and they’ve been very impressed by the creativity displayed by your chefs and the quality of fresh ingredients across the state.’” Poullennec spoke alongside chef Thomas Keller, the founding chef of The French Laundry, the first restaurant in California to receive three stars, Michelin’s highest honor.

Michelin’s reach has been expanding across the world in the past few years. It now publishes guides dedicated to Shanghai, Bangkok, São Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro.

At first glance, the choice of California may seem an odd one. The restaurant guide typically rewards restaurants whose kitchens exhibit refined technique and whose owners offer attentive service and a comprehensive wine list. A three-star restaurant traditionally brings to mind a fancy French restaurant with pressed white tablecloths. By comparison, California is the farm stand for the rest of the U.S., and its most famous chefs have preached a simple approach to cooking, a stark contrast to France’s halls of haute cuisine. Los Angeles, California’s largest city, was never taken as seriously by restaurant writers as New York or San Francisco because its food scene isn’t defined by fine dining. The eateries most evocative of Los Angeles are the taco truck and the roadside burger stand, the strip mall sushi joint and Korean barbecue.

Yet the culinary world has changed, and Michelin is trying to change along with it. Critics and judges who grew to appreciate the simple excellence of Alice Waters, the chef at Chez Panisse, have also bestowed stars on restaurants that specialize in inexpensive delicacies like Singaporean chicken rice, Hong Kong dim sum, and Chinese roast goose.

Michelin acknowledged this dissonance, pledging to maintain its standards while also praising California’s “signature high-quality yet laid-back dining ambience,” according to Poullennec.


SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Michelin is creating a restaurant guide for California, the first regional guide in the U.S. from the world’s foremost arbiter of gastronomic excellence.

The California guide will include restaurants from the San Francisco Bay Area, wine country, Los Angeles, Monterey, Orange County, Sacramento, San Diego, and Santa Barbara, the company announced on March 5. Michelin will reveal which restaurants receive its coveted star rankings at a June event in Huntington Beach.

The guide is an indication of the growing global recognition of the dining scene throughout the state of California. Michelin published its first guide in 1900, and has long published guides dedicated to countries in Europe. It began a guide to San Francisco, which included the restaurants of the Napa Valley, in 2007. Chicago, New York, and Washington, D.C., are the only other U.S. cities that have their own standalone guides. (One for Los Angeles was discontinued in 2009.)

“We recognize California as the land of food and wine,’’ Gwendal Poullennec, the international director of the Michelin guides, said. “Michelin inspectors have been dining anonymously across California over the past year, and they’ve been very impressed by the creativity displayed by your chefs and the quality of fresh ingredients across the state.’” Poullennec spoke alongside chef Thomas Keller, the founding chef of The French Laundry, the first restaurant in California to receive three stars, Michelin’s highest honor.

Michelin’s reach has been expanding across the world in the past few years. It now publishes guides dedicated to Shanghai, Bangkok, São Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro.

At first glance, the choice of California may seem an odd one. The restaurant guide typically rewards restaurants whose kitchens exhibit refined technique and whose owners offer attentive service and a comprehensive wine list. A three-star restaurant traditionally brings to mind a fancy French restaurant with pressed white tablecloths. By comparison, California is the farm stand for the rest of the U.S., and its most famous chefs have preached a simple approach to cooking, a stark contrast to France’s halls of haute cuisine. Los Angeles, California’s largest city, was never taken as seriously by restaurant writers as New York or San Francisco because its food scene isn’t defined by fine dining. The eateries most evocative of Los Angeles are the taco truck and the roadside burger stand, the strip mall sushi joint and Korean barbecue.

Yet the culinary world has changed, and Michelin is trying to change along with it. Critics and judges who grew to appreciate the simple excellence of Alice Waters, the chef at Chez Panisse, have also bestowed stars on restaurants that specialize in inexpensive delicacies like Singaporean chicken rice, Hong Kong dim sum, and Chinese roast goose.

Michelin acknowledged this dissonance, pledging to maintain its standards while also praising California’s “signature high-quality yet laid-back dining ambience,” according to Poullennec.


SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Michelin is creating a restaurant guide for California, the first regional guide in the U.S. from the world’s foremost arbiter of gastronomic excellence.

The California guide will include restaurants from the San Francisco Bay Area, wine country, Los Angeles, Monterey, Orange County, Sacramento, San Diego, and Santa Barbara, the company announced on March 5. Michelin will reveal which restaurants receive its coveted star rankings at a June event in Huntington Beach.

The guide is an indication of the growing global recognition of the dining scene throughout the state of California. Michelin published its first guide in 1900, and has long published guides dedicated to countries in Europe. It began a guide to San Francisco, which included the restaurants of the Napa Valley, in 2007. Chicago, New York, and Washington, D.C., are the only other U.S. cities that have their own standalone guides. (One for Los Angeles was discontinued in 2009.)

“We recognize California as the land of food and wine,’’ Gwendal Poullennec, the international director of the Michelin guides, said. “Michelin inspectors have been dining anonymously across California over the past year, and they’ve been very impressed by the creativity displayed by your chefs and the quality of fresh ingredients across the state.’” Poullennec spoke alongside chef Thomas Keller, the founding chef of The French Laundry, the first restaurant in California to receive three stars, Michelin’s highest honor.

Michelin’s reach has been expanding across the world in the past few years. It now publishes guides dedicated to Shanghai, Bangkok, São Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro.

At first glance, the choice of California may seem an odd one. The restaurant guide typically rewards restaurants whose kitchens exhibit refined technique and whose owners offer attentive service and a comprehensive wine list. A three-star restaurant traditionally brings to mind a fancy French restaurant with pressed white tablecloths. By comparison, California is the farm stand for the rest of the U.S., and its most famous chefs have preached a simple approach to cooking, a stark contrast to France’s halls of haute cuisine. Los Angeles, California’s largest city, was never taken as seriously by restaurant writers as New York or San Francisco because its food scene isn’t defined by fine dining. The eateries most evocative of Los Angeles are the taco truck and the roadside burger stand, the strip mall sushi joint and Korean barbecue.

Yet the culinary world has changed, and Michelin is trying to change along with it. Critics and judges who grew to appreciate the simple excellence of Alice Waters, the chef at Chez Panisse, have also bestowed stars on restaurants that specialize in inexpensive delicacies like Singaporean chicken rice, Hong Kong dim sum, and Chinese roast goose.

Michelin acknowledged this dissonance, pledging to maintain its standards while also praising California’s “signature high-quality yet laid-back dining ambience,” according to Poullennec.


SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Michelin is creating a restaurant guide for California, the first regional guide in the U.S. from the world’s foremost arbiter of gastronomic excellence.

The California guide will include restaurants from the San Francisco Bay Area, wine country, Los Angeles, Monterey, Orange County, Sacramento, San Diego, and Santa Barbara, the company announced on March 5. Michelin will reveal which restaurants receive its coveted star rankings at a June event in Huntington Beach.

The guide is an indication of the growing global recognition of the dining scene throughout the state of California. Michelin published its first guide in 1900, and has long published guides dedicated to countries in Europe. It began a guide to San Francisco, which included the restaurants of the Napa Valley, in 2007. Chicago, New York, and Washington, D.C., are the only other U.S. cities that have their own standalone guides. (One for Los Angeles was discontinued in 2009.)

“We recognize California as the land of food and wine,’’ Gwendal Poullennec, the international director of the Michelin guides, said. “Michelin inspectors have been dining anonymously across California over the past year, and they’ve been very impressed by the creativity displayed by your chefs and the quality of fresh ingredients across the state.’” Poullennec spoke alongside chef Thomas Keller, the founding chef of The French Laundry, the first restaurant in California to receive three stars, Michelin’s highest honor.

Michelin’s reach has been expanding across the world in the past few years. It now publishes guides dedicated to Shanghai, Bangkok, São Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro.

At first glance, the choice of California may seem an odd one. The restaurant guide typically rewards restaurants whose kitchens exhibit refined technique and whose owners offer attentive service and a comprehensive wine list. A three-star restaurant traditionally brings to mind a fancy French restaurant with pressed white tablecloths. By comparison, California is the farm stand for the rest of the U.S., and its most famous chefs have preached a simple approach to cooking, a stark contrast to France’s halls of haute cuisine. Los Angeles, California’s largest city, was never taken as seriously by restaurant writers as New York or San Francisco because its food scene isn’t defined by fine dining. The eateries most evocative of Los Angeles are the taco truck and the roadside burger stand, the strip mall sushi joint and Korean barbecue.

Yet the culinary world has changed, and Michelin is trying to change along with it. Critics and judges who grew to appreciate the simple excellence of Alice Waters, the chef at Chez Panisse, have also bestowed stars on restaurants that specialize in inexpensive delicacies like Singaporean chicken rice, Hong Kong dim sum, and Chinese roast goose.

Michelin acknowledged this dissonance, pledging to maintain its standards while also praising California’s “signature high-quality yet laid-back dining ambience,” according to Poullennec.


SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Michelin is creating a restaurant guide for California, the first regional guide in the U.S. from the world’s foremost arbiter of gastronomic excellence.

The California guide will include restaurants from the San Francisco Bay Area, wine country, Los Angeles, Monterey, Orange County, Sacramento, San Diego, and Santa Barbara, the company announced on March 5. Michelin will reveal which restaurants receive its coveted star rankings at a June event in Huntington Beach.

The guide is an indication of the growing global recognition of the dining scene throughout the state of California. Michelin published its first guide in 1900, and has long published guides dedicated to countries in Europe. It began a guide to San Francisco, which included the restaurants of the Napa Valley, in 2007. Chicago, New York, and Washington, D.C., are the only other U.S. cities that have their own standalone guides. (One for Los Angeles was discontinued in 2009.)

“We recognize California as the land of food and wine,’’ Gwendal Poullennec, the international director of the Michelin guides, said. “Michelin inspectors have been dining anonymously across California over the past year, and they’ve been very impressed by the creativity displayed by your chefs and the quality of fresh ingredients across the state.’” Poullennec spoke alongside chef Thomas Keller, the founding chef of The French Laundry, the first restaurant in California to receive three stars, Michelin’s highest honor.

Michelin’s reach has been expanding across the world in the past few years. It now publishes guides dedicated to Shanghai, Bangkok, São Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro.

At first glance, the choice of California may seem an odd one. The restaurant guide typically rewards restaurants whose kitchens exhibit refined technique and whose owners offer attentive service and a comprehensive wine list. A three-star restaurant traditionally brings to mind a fancy French restaurant with pressed white tablecloths. By comparison, California is the farm stand for the rest of the U.S., and its most famous chefs have preached a simple approach to cooking, a stark contrast to France’s halls of haute cuisine. Los Angeles, California’s largest city, was never taken as seriously by restaurant writers as New York or San Francisco because its food scene isn’t defined by fine dining. The eateries most evocative of Los Angeles are the taco truck and the roadside burger stand, the strip mall sushi joint and Korean barbecue.

Yet the culinary world has changed, and Michelin is trying to change along with it. Critics and judges who grew to appreciate the simple excellence of Alice Waters, the chef at Chez Panisse, have also bestowed stars on restaurants that specialize in inexpensive delicacies like Singaporean chicken rice, Hong Kong dim sum, and Chinese roast goose.

Michelin acknowledged this dissonance, pledging to maintain its standards while also praising California’s “signature high-quality yet laid-back dining ambience,” according to Poullennec.


SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Michelin is creating a restaurant guide for California, the first regional guide in the U.S. from the world’s foremost arbiter of gastronomic excellence.

The California guide will include restaurants from the San Francisco Bay Area, wine country, Los Angeles, Monterey, Orange County, Sacramento, San Diego, and Santa Barbara, the company announced on March 5. Michelin will reveal which restaurants receive its coveted star rankings at a June event in Huntington Beach.

The guide is an indication of the growing global recognition of the dining scene throughout the state of California. Michelin published its first guide in 1900, and has long published guides dedicated to countries in Europe. It began a guide to San Francisco, which included the restaurants of the Napa Valley, in 2007. Chicago, New York, and Washington, D.C., are the only other U.S. cities that have their own standalone guides. (One for Los Angeles was discontinued in 2009.)

“We recognize California as the land of food and wine,’’ Gwendal Poullennec, the international director of the Michelin guides, said. “Michelin inspectors have been dining anonymously across California over the past year, and they’ve been very impressed by the creativity displayed by your chefs and the quality of fresh ingredients across the state.’” Poullennec spoke alongside chef Thomas Keller, the founding chef of The French Laundry, the first restaurant in California to receive three stars, Michelin’s highest honor.

Michelin’s reach has been expanding across the world in the past few years. It now publishes guides dedicated to Shanghai, Bangkok, São Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro.

At first glance, the choice of California may seem an odd one. The restaurant guide typically rewards restaurants whose kitchens exhibit refined technique and whose owners offer attentive service and a comprehensive wine list. A three-star restaurant traditionally brings to mind a fancy French restaurant with pressed white tablecloths. By comparison, California is the farm stand for the rest of the U.S., and its most famous chefs have preached a simple approach to cooking, a stark contrast to France’s halls of haute cuisine. Los Angeles, California’s largest city, was never taken as seriously by restaurant writers as New York or San Francisco because its food scene isn’t defined by fine dining. The eateries most evocative of Los Angeles are the taco truck and the roadside burger stand, the strip mall sushi joint and Korean barbecue.

Yet the culinary world has changed, and Michelin is trying to change along with it. Critics and judges who grew to appreciate the simple excellence of Alice Waters, the chef at Chez Panisse, have also bestowed stars on restaurants that specialize in inexpensive delicacies like Singaporean chicken rice, Hong Kong dim sum, and Chinese roast goose.

Michelin acknowledged this dissonance, pledging to maintain its standards while also praising California’s “signature high-quality yet laid-back dining ambience,” according to Poullennec.


SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Michelin is creating a restaurant guide for California, the first regional guide in the U.S. from the world’s foremost arbiter of gastronomic excellence.

The California guide will include restaurants from the San Francisco Bay Area, wine country, Los Angeles, Monterey, Orange County, Sacramento, San Diego, and Santa Barbara, the company announced on March 5. Michelin will reveal which restaurants receive its coveted star rankings at a June event in Huntington Beach.

The guide is an indication of the growing global recognition of the dining scene throughout the state of California. Michelin published its first guide in 1900, and has long published guides dedicated to countries in Europe. It began a guide to San Francisco, which included the restaurants of the Napa Valley, in 2007. Chicago, New York, and Washington, D.C., are the only other U.S. cities that have their own standalone guides. (One for Los Angeles was discontinued in 2009.)

“We recognize California as the land of food and wine,’’ Gwendal Poullennec, the international director of the Michelin guides, said. “Michelin inspectors have been dining anonymously across California over the past year, and they’ve been very impressed by the creativity displayed by your chefs and the quality of fresh ingredients across the state.’” Poullennec spoke alongside chef Thomas Keller, the founding chef of The French Laundry, the first restaurant in California to receive three stars, Michelin’s highest honor.

Michelin’s reach has been expanding across the world in the past few years. It now publishes guides dedicated to Shanghai, Bangkok, São Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro.

At first glance, the choice of California may seem an odd one. The restaurant guide typically rewards restaurants whose kitchens exhibit refined technique and whose owners offer attentive service and a comprehensive wine list. A three-star restaurant traditionally brings to mind a fancy French restaurant with pressed white tablecloths. By comparison, California is the farm stand for the rest of the U.S., and its most famous chefs have preached a simple approach to cooking, a stark contrast to France’s halls of haute cuisine. Los Angeles, California’s largest city, was never taken as seriously by restaurant writers as New York or San Francisco because its food scene isn’t defined by fine dining. The eateries most evocative of Los Angeles are the taco truck and the roadside burger stand, the strip mall sushi joint and Korean barbecue.

Yet the culinary world has changed, and Michelin is trying to change along with it. Critics and judges who grew to appreciate the simple excellence of Alice Waters, the chef at Chez Panisse, have also bestowed stars on restaurants that specialize in inexpensive delicacies like Singaporean chicken rice, Hong Kong dim sum, and Chinese roast goose.

Michelin acknowledged this dissonance, pledging to maintain its standards while also praising California’s “signature high-quality yet laid-back dining ambience,” according to Poullennec.


SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Michelin is creating a restaurant guide for California, the first regional guide in the U.S. from the world’s foremost arbiter of gastronomic excellence.

The California guide will include restaurants from the San Francisco Bay Area, wine country, Los Angeles, Monterey, Orange County, Sacramento, San Diego, and Santa Barbara, the company announced on March 5. Michelin will reveal which restaurants receive its coveted star rankings at a June event in Huntington Beach.

The guide is an indication of the growing global recognition of the dining scene throughout the state of California. Michelin published its first guide in 1900, and has long published guides dedicated to countries in Europe. It began a guide to San Francisco, which included the restaurants of the Napa Valley, in 2007. Chicago, New York, and Washington, D.C., are the only other U.S. cities that have their own standalone guides. (One for Los Angeles was discontinued in 2009.)

“We recognize California as the land of food and wine,’’ Gwendal Poullennec, the international director of the Michelin guides, said. “Michelin inspectors have been dining anonymously across California over the past year, and they’ve been very impressed by the creativity displayed by your chefs and the quality of fresh ingredients across the state.’” Poullennec spoke alongside chef Thomas Keller, the founding chef of The French Laundry, the first restaurant in California to receive three stars, Michelin’s highest honor.

Michelin’s reach has been expanding across the world in the past few years. It now publishes guides dedicated to Shanghai, Bangkok, São Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro.

At first glance, the choice of California may seem an odd one. The restaurant guide typically rewards restaurants whose kitchens exhibit refined technique and whose owners offer attentive service and a comprehensive wine list. A three-star restaurant traditionally brings to mind a fancy French restaurant with pressed white tablecloths. By comparison, California is the farm stand for the rest of the U.S., and its most famous chefs have preached a simple approach to cooking, a stark contrast to France’s halls of haute cuisine. Los Angeles, California’s largest city, was never taken as seriously by restaurant writers as New York or San Francisco because its food scene isn’t defined by fine dining. The eateries most evocative of Los Angeles are the taco truck and the roadside burger stand, the strip mall sushi joint and Korean barbecue.

Yet the culinary world has changed, and Michelin is trying to change along with it. Critics and judges who grew to appreciate the simple excellence of Alice Waters, the chef at Chez Panisse, have also bestowed stars on restaurants that specialize in inexpensive delicacies like Singaporean chicken rice, Hong Kong dim sum, and Chinese roast goose.

Michelin acknowledged this dissonance, pledging to maintain its standards while also praising California’s “signature high-quality yet laid-back dining ambience,” according to Poullennec.